Panthéon,_Paris_25_March_2012
Credit: “Wikipedia” / by Camille Gévaudan


The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens. It is an early example of neoclassicism, with a façade modeled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a dome that owes some of its character to Bramante’s “Tempietto”. Located in the 5th arrondissement on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the Panthéon looks out over all of Paris. Designer Jacques-Germain Soufflot had the intention of combining the lightness and brightness of the gothic cathedral with classical principles, but its role as a mausoleum required the great Gothic windows to be blocked. However, as of February 2015, the dome is now covered for remedial works, which include providing reinforcement for the roof. Iron bars in the roof have been rusting and causing falls of masonry inside the building.

SONY DSC
Credit: “Wikipedia”/ by Jebulon


The overall design was that of a Greek cross with massive portico of Corinthian columns. Its ambitious lines called for a vast building 110 metres long by 84 metres wide, and 83 metres high. No less vast was its crypt. Soufflot’s masterstroke is concealed from casual view: the triple dome, each shell fitted within the others, permits a view through the oculus of the coffered inner dome of the second dome, frescoed by Antoine Gros with The Apotheosis of Saint Genevieve. The outermost dome is built of stone bound together with iron cramps and covered with lead sheathing, rather than of carpentry construction, as was the common French practice of the period. Concealed flying buttresses pass the massive weight of the triple construction outwards to the portico columns.

Intérieur_du_Panthéon
Credit: “Wikipedia”


The foundations were laid in 1758, but due to the economic problems in France at this time, work proceeded slowly. In 1780, Soufflot died and was replaced by his student, Jean-Baptiste Rondelet. The remodeled Abbey of St. Genevieve was finally completed in 1790, coinciding with the early stages of the French Revolution. Upon the death of the popular French orator and statesman Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, comte de Mirabeau on 2 April 1791, the National Constituent Assembly, whose president had been Mirabeau, ordered that the building be changed from a church to a mausoleum for the interment of great Frenchmen, retaining Quatremère de Quincy to oversee the project. Mirabeau was the first person interred there, on 4 April 1791.[2] Jean Guillaume Moitte created a pediment sculptural group The Fatherland crowning the heroic and civic virtues that was replaced upon the Bourbon Restoration with one by David d’Angers.

Panthéon_de_Paris_-_03
Credit: ” Wikipedia” / by Carlos Delgado


In January 2007, President Jacques Chirac unveiled a plaque in the Panthéon to more than 2600 people recognized as Righteous Among the Nations by the Yad Vashem memorial in Israel for saving the lives of Jews who would otherwise have been deported to concentration camps. The tribute in the Panthéon underlines the fact that around three quarters of the country’s Jewish population survived the war, often thanks to ordinary people who provided help at the risk of their own life.

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Credit: “Wikipedia” / by Son of Groucho

Pantheon_wider_centered
Credit: “Wikipedia” / by Jean-Pierre Lavoie

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Project Description

Location
Place du Panthéon, Paris
Architect(s)
Jacques-Germain, Soufflot, Jean-Baptiste Rondelet
Architectural style
Neoclassicism
Type
Mausoleum
Groundbreaking
1758
Completed
1790[/vc_wp_text]

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